bible-truths.com/forums

Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
Advanced search  

News:

Need Account Help?  Email bibletruths.forum@gmail.com   

Forgotten password reminders does not work. Contact the email above and state what you want your password changed to. (it must be at least 8 characters)

Pages: [1]   Go Down

Author Topic: The Gospel of Judas?  (Read 1529 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

nightmare sasuke

  • Guest
The Gospel of Judas?
« on: May 02, 2006, 11:41:42 PM »

Does anyone have any factual historical proof that will show that this so-called gospel is indeed a book of lies? My English teacher keeps bragging about it and if I ever want to explain to him that it is unscriptural I have to do so historically. Thanks.
Logged

rvhill

  • Guest
Re: The Gospel of Judas?
« Reply #1 on: May 03, 2006, 12:38:02 AM »

Quote from: nightmare sasuke
Does anyone have any factual historical proof that will show that this so-called gospel is indeed a book of lies? My English teacher keeps bragging about it and if I ever want to explain to him that it is unscriptural I have to do so historically. Thanks.


It a gnostic text and there for it is not a part of the bible. Christianity and Gnosticism do not mix.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Irenaeus mentions a Gospel of Judas in his anti-Gnostic work Adversus Haereses, written in about 180. He writes there are some who:

declare that Cain derived his being from the Power above, and acknowledge that Esau, Korah, the Sodomites, and all such persons, are related to themselves. . .They declare that Judas the traitor was thoroughly acquainted with these things, and that he alone, knowing the truth as no others did, accomplished the mystery of the betrayal; by him all things, both earthly and heavenly, were thus thrown into confusion. They produce a fictional history of this kind, which they style the Gospel of Judas. [2]
This is in reference to the Cainites, a sect of Gnosticism that especially worshipped Cain as a hero. The Cainites, like a large number of Gnostic groups, were semi-maltheists believing that the god of the Old Testament — Yahweh — was evil, and a quite different and much lesser being to the deity that had created the universe, and was responsible for sending Jesus. Such Gnostic groups worshipped as heroes all the Biblical figures which had sought to discover knowledge or challenge Yahweh's authority, while demonizing those who would have been seen as heroes in a more orthodox interpretation.

The Gospel of Judas belongs to a school of Gnosticism called Sethian Gnosticm, a group who looked to Adam's son Seth as their spiritual ancestor. As in other Sethian dociments, Jesus is equated with Seth: "The first is Seth, who is called Christ" although this is in part of an emanationist mythology describing both positive and negative aeons. It is not clear whether the Gospel of Judas is based on any of the canonical Gospel accounts of Jesus' last days, furter work much be done.

For metaphysical reasons, the Sethian Gnostics authors of this text maintained that Judas acted as he did in order that mankind might be redeemed by the death of Jesus' mortal body. For this reason, they regarded Judas as worthy of gratitude and veneration. The Gospel of Judas does not describe any events after the arrest of Jesus.

By contrast, the Gospel of John, unlike the synoptic gospels, contains the enigmatic statement of Jesus to Judas, as the latter leaves the Passover meal to set in motion the betrayal process, "Do quickly what you have to do." (John 13:27) (trans. The New English Bible). Some view this as a direct command to Judas to do what he did, while others cite the first portion of the same verse, in which it says that "Satan entered into him," leaving the possible interpretation of the passage to mean that Jesus was speaking instead to Satan.

Some two centuries after Irenaeus' complaint, Epiphanius of Salamis, bishop of Cyprus, criticized the Gospel of Judas for treating as commendable the person whom he saw as the betrayer of Jesus, and as one who "performed a good work for our salvation." (Haeres., xxxviii
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
 

Page created in 0.073 seconds with 24 queries.