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Author Topic: Secret Worlds: The Universe Within  (Read 3324 times)

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hillsbororiver

  • Guest
Secret Worlds: The Universe Within
« on: January 21, 2008, 10:06:03 PM »

This has been around a while and I might have even posted the link some time ago but as I was cleaning up "My Favorites" folder I came across it and I found that it is still very captivating and a marvel to meditate on.

http://micro.magnet.fsu.edu/primer/java/scienceopticsu/powersof10/

Enjoy!

His Peace to you,

Joe
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Matt

  • Guest
Re: Secret Worlds: The Universe Within
« Reply #1 on: January 22, 2008, 12:39:00 AM »

Thanks Joe,
  I love this stuff too!  Perhaps it should replace the link all the way at the bottom on BT where there is currently a link to a pic of the Sombrero Galaxy?
Just a thought,
Matt
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dewey

  • Guest
Re: Secret Worlds: The Universe Within
« Reply #2 on: January 22, 2008, 09:02:51 AM »

wow joe  that was so great,i dont have words to express my self.  all i can say is  LOVE YOU BROTHER . dewey said it.
 
  P. S. thanks for taking the time to share.
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Sorin

  • Guest
Re: Secret Worlds: The Universe Within
« Reply #3 on: January 22, 2008, 09:23:36 AM »

Cool stuff Joe. I would love to go into space and behold the earth, and everything from that perspective. What a sight that would be!

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gmik

  • Guest
Re: Secret Worlds: The Universe Within
« Reply #4 on: January 22, 2008, 07:20:50 PM »

Joe, glad you recycled this one.  Newbies can see it.  It is still awesome to think of this Universe!!

To me, the first picture looks like the very last picture!!!  Only God!!
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musicman

  • Guest
Re: Secret Worlds: The Universe Within
« Reply #5 on: January 22, 2008, 08:05:08 PM »

How in the world did we get a camera 10 milion light years away from us to take that first photo?
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gmik

  • Guest
Re: Secret Worlds: The Universe Within
« Reply #6 on: January 23, 2008, 12:15:00 AM »

 ;D :D ;D :D
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hillsbororiver

  • Guest
Re: Secret Worlds: The Universe Within
« Reply #7 on: January 23, 2008, 10:55:50 AM »

How in the world did we get a camera 10 milion light years away from us to take that first photo?

Good question musicman, I hope the following explaination(s) helps;


Note: - The sequence of images in this tutorial has been optimized for maximum visual impact. Due to the fact that discrete exponential increments are not always the most convenient interval for illustrating this concept, our artists and programmers have made dimensional approximations in some cases. As a consequence, the relative size and positioning of several objects in the tutorial reflect this fact.

The original concept underlying this tutorial was advanced by Dutch engineer and educator Kees Boeke, who first utilized powers to aid in visualization of large numbers in a 1957 publication entitled "Cosmic View, the Universe in 40 Jumps". Several years later, in 1968, architect Charles Eames, along with his wife Ray, directed a "rough sketch" film of the same concept and finally completed the work (entitled the "Powers of Ten") with the assistance of Philip Morrison in 1977. Other notable contributors to this effort include Philip's wife Phylis, who has assisted in translation of the concept into several beautifully illustrated books that are currently still available through the booksellers.

This came off the same page as the images @

 http://micro.magnet.fsu.edu/primer/java/scienceopticsu/powersof10/

Hubble vs. Webb: How Far Will They See?

As reports Forbes in "Peering Back At The Universe's Past," space telescopes are really acting as time machines. They can watch objects which are so far from us that light has taken billions of years before reaching their mirrors. The Hubble telescope is able to look at events that took place 13.3 billion light-years ago. But the James E. Webb space telescope, currently under construction, and scheduled to be launched in 2011, will be able to see even further and catch phenomena which happened 13.5 billion light-years ago. The astronomers think the Webb telescope might even be able to see up to 13.7 billion light-years ago, when our universe was just 200 or 300 million years old. We are used to see fantastic images from Hubble, without paying too much attention to the characteristics of the telescope itself. So here is a thorough comparison between the two space telescopes.

Before starting this comparison, here are the opening paragraphs of the Forbes article.

Even the universe was young once. Someday soon, astronomers hope to snap a few of its baby pictures. The tool they'll use to do it is the James E. Webb Space Telescope, set to launch into space atop a European Space Agency rocket in 2011. Once it's up and running -- it is now being built by Northrup Grumman for NASA, the European Space Agency and the Canadian Space Agency--astronomers hope to peer back in time to when the universe was a toddler, a mere 200 million years after its birth in the "Big Bang" that took place 13.7 billion years ago.
Space telescopes act like time machines because the objects they look at are so far away that the light has taken billions of years just to get to the telescope, even though that light has been traveling at the speed of, well, light. And while scientists have a good understanding of what happened during the first 100 million years or so of the universe's life, there's a big blank spot in its timeline from that point to about a billion years after the Big Bang. Their hope is to see examples of the earliest stars and galaxies and study their evolution and the production of elements, which in turn leads to better understanding of the origins of life.
What are the hopes of the astronomers who will use the future telescope?

"We have lots of stories that say there should have been a first generation of stars," says John Mather, NASA's senior astrophysicist working on the Webb telescope. These primordial stars -- known as "population 3" stars, would have formed early in the history of the universe out of pure hydrogen and helium, burned for a short three million years or so and then exploded.
"We don't have any direct evidence that these stars existed, but we can see traces of them in the cosmic background radiation," Mather says. That background radiation is a form of electromagnetic radiation that is seen in every direction in the universe, and considered the best available evidence for the Big Bang theory, which holds that the universe came into being in an unbelievably massive explosion more than 13 billion years ago.

http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:Hd3GNZD7d44J:www.primidi.com/2004/05/19.html+how+far+can+hubble+see&hl=en&ct=clnk&cd=1&gl=ca

Peace,

Joe


The short answer just might be the images were taken from Hubble looking out (light years away) and from proportionately working back toward earth.

 
 
 
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hillsbororiver

  • Guest
Re: Secret Worlds: The Universe Within
« Reply #8 on: January 23, 2008, 12:32:22 PM »

Hi Matt, Dewey, Sorin & Gena,

I am glad you enjoyed those images, it sure does give us a glimpse into God's "creativeness."  ;)

Here is an interesting mathmatical formula that is also on this page;

 Earth = 12.76 x 10+6 = 12,760,000 meters wide
(12.76 million meters)

Plant Cell = 12.76 x 10-6 = 0.00001276 meters wide
(12.76 millionths of a meter)

http://micro.magnet.fsu.edu/primer/java/scienceopticsu/powersof10/

Peace,

Joe
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hillsbororiver

  • Guest
Re: Secret Worlds: The Universe Within
« Reply #9 on: January 23, 2008, 09:39:58 PM »



Job 9:8  Which alone spreadeth out the heavens, and treadeth upon the waves of the sea.
 
Job 9:9  Which maketh Arcturus, Orion, and Pleiades, and the chambers of the south.
 
Job 9:10  Which doeth great things past finding out; yea, and wonders without number.
 
Psa 147:4  He telleth the number of the stars; he calleth them all by their names.

And this incredible Universe is just a shadow of what he has prepared for His Sons and Daughters!

Peace,

Joe



 
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hillsbororiver

  • Guest
Re: Secret Worlds: The Universe Within
« Reply #10 on: January 26, 2008, 12:38:33 PM »


Take a penny out of your pocket or piggy bank and give it a good look, a fairly small and unspectacular piece of metal but did you know that this penny contains about 28,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 copper atoms?

As you ponder this throw in the fact that these atoms are 99.99% empty space, actually I could have thrown in a few more 9's after the decimal point but you get my drift.

Pretty amazing stuff isn't it?

Peace,

Joe
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Sorin

  • Guest
Re: Secret Worlds: The Universe Within
« Reply #11 on: January 29, 2008, 09:42:06 PM »

Wow, Joe! That is amazing stuff, indeed.
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hillsbororiver

  • Guest
Re: Secret Worlds: The Universe Within
« Reply #12 on: January 31, 2008, 02:06:53 PM »

Hi Sorin,

Did you see this in the other thread?
  http://www.phrenopolis.com/perspective/atom/

(From the above link)

And you thought there was a lot of empty space in the solar system. Well, there's even more nothing inside an atom. A hydrogen atom is only about a ten millionth of a millimeter in diameter, but the proton in the middle is a hundred thousand times smaller, and the electron whizzing around the outside is a thousand times smaller than THAT. (Be sure to check out the scale in the link provided)The rest of the atom is empty. I tried to picture it, and I couldn't. So I put together this page - and I still can't picture it.

The page is scaled so that the smallest thing on it, the electron, is one pixel. That makes the proton, this big ball right next to us, a thousand pixels across, and the distance between them is... yep, fifty million pixels (not a hundred million, because we're only showing the radius of the atom. ie: from the middle to the edge). If your monitor displays 72 pixels to the inch, then that works out to eleven miles - making this possibly the biggest page you've ever seen (I personally have seen one that was set up to be even bigger, though its exact size did not seem to represent anything specific).

I recommend trying to scroll from here to the right a screen at a time, just to see how long it takes the little thumb in the scrollbar to move visibly. True masochists can try to scroll through the whole eleven miles - but the scenery along the way is pretty bleak.

I used to think that things like rocks and buildings and my own skeleton were fairly solid. But they're made up of atoms, and atoms, as you can see here, contain so little actual material that they can barely be said to exist.

We are all phantoms.

(Note: users of older versions of Internet Explorer may not be able to scroll manually all the way to the right edge. If you want to actually see the electron, you may need to click HERE. Oddly, for some other users, this link will not work. Hopefully there is no one for whom both are true.)

Amazing stuff!

Peace,

Joe




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Sorin

  • Guest
Re: Secret Worlds: The Universe Within
« Reply #13 on: February 01, 2008, 12:05:37 AM »

Wow Joe!...amazing stuff! Thanks.
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