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Author Topic: Question about age-noun and adjective  (Read 2088 times)

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Brett

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Question about age-noun and adjective
« on: May 10, 2006, 07:55:13 PM »

I am still learning of noun and adjective. The Greek word for age/eon is aion and is the noun and aionios is the adjective. So, aionios is plural like ages/eons with the end of 's' is adjective? Does aion have plural like aions? If so, then what is mean aionios adjective? Hope you can help.

Thank you!  O:)
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Lightseeker

  • Guest
Re: Question about age-noun and adjective
« Reply #1 on: May 11, 2006, 02:48:30 PM »

Quote from: Brett
I am still learning of noun and adjective. The Greek word for age/eon is the noun and aionios is the adjective. So, aionios is plural like ages/eons with the end of 's' is adjective? Does aion have plural like aions? If so, then what is mean aionios adjective? Hope you can help.

Thank you!  O:)



Brett,  

Let me try to answer as I understand this.

The Greek word for age isn't eon, as you said...it’s aion,  and we derive the English equivalent word, 'eon', from it.  The Greek word aion and the English word eon are best defined as 'a long period of time', but they do not mean 'eternity'.  If it meant 'eternity', then scripture which says 'in the ages/aion to come' wouldn't make sense (in the eternities to come???).  

The word aionios is derived from the word aion, and that’s the word (aionios) that bible translators incorrectly translate "eternity".  It is a fundamental law of grammar that a derivative cannot have a force greater than that which it is derived from.  So, if the noun aion means an age or long period of time...the derivative aionios cannot possibly be translated as eternity.

To give you an English example, take the word hour which is a noun.  How many minutes are in an hour?  60 minutes!  Now take the word 'hourly' which is an adjective derived from the noun 'hour'.  How many minutes are in 'hourly' meetings?  60 minutes again.  So if you have hourly meetings forever, how many minutes are in those hours?  The answer is still 60 minutes.

The word hourly has more to do with a quality of an hour than it does with the quantity of time in an hour.  So also does the word 'aionios' have more to do with a quality of time happening within an age/aion.  That's why the Young's Literal Translation always translates the aionios as 'age during'.  It describes a quality of something taking place in an age/aion.  In other words aionian life isn't a quantity of years but a quality of life taking place within those years.  It speaks of God's life within the age.  Does that mean God's life is only 'an age'?  No, it just means His truly endless life being manifested within that time/aion/age.

Hope this helps.
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Origen II

  • Guest
Re: Question about age-noun and adjective
« Reply #2 on: May 11, 2006, 05:20:53 PM »

Quote from: Lightseeker
Quote from: Brett
I am still learning of noun and adjective. The Greek word for age/eon is the noun and aionios is the adjective. So, aionios is plural like ages/eons with the end of 's' is adjective? Does aion have plural like aions? If so, then what is mean aionios adjective? Hope you can help.

Thank you!  O:)



Brett,  

Let me try to answer as I understand this.

The Greek word for age isn't eon, as you said...it’s aion,  and we derive the English equivalent word, 'eon', from it.  The Greek word aion and the English word eon are best defined as 'a long period of time', but they do not mean 'eternity'.  If it meant 'eternity', then scripture which says 'in the ages/aion to come' wouldn't make sense (in the eternities to come???).  

The word aionios is derived from the word aion, and that’s the word (aionios) that bible translators incorrectly translate "eternity".  It is a fundamental law of grammar that a derivative cannot have a force greater than that which it is derived from.  So, if the noun aion means an age or long period of time...the derivative aionios cannot possibly be translated as eternity.

To give you an English example, take the word hour which is a noun.  How many minutes are in an hour?  60 minutes!  Now take the word 'hourly' which is an adjective derived from the noun 'hour'.  How many minutes are in 'hourly' meetings?  60 minutes again.  So if you have hourly meetings forever, how many minutes are in those hours?  The answer is still 60 minutes.

The word hourly has more to do with a quality of an hour than it does with the quantity of time in an hour.  So also does the word 'aionios' have more to do with a quality of time happening within an age/aion.  That's why the Young's Literal Translation always translates the aionios as 'age during'.  It describes a quality of something taking place in an age/aion.  In other words aionian life isn't a quantity of years but a quality of life taking place within those years.  It speaks of God's life within the age.  Does that mean God's life is only 'an age'?  No, it just means His truly endless life being manifested within that time/aion/age.

Hope this helps.



May I correct something?

The adj. for "hour" is not hourly, but "hour-long/hour-abiding". The noun for "hourly" would better be "hours" or "hourlies".

Why? Because you cannot say that an 'hourly meeting' is 60 minutes long. "Hourly" is a form of pluralism.
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Lightseeker

  • Guest
Question about age-noun and adjective
« Reply #3 on: May 11, 2006, 07:41:56 PM »

Origin

Quote
May I correct something?

The adj. for "hour" is not hourly, but "hour-long/hour-abiding". The noun for "hourly" would better be "hours" or "hourlies".

Why? Because you cannot say that an 'hourly meeting' is 60 minutes long. "Hourly" is a form of pluralism.


O,

Always open for correction.   :D

I need a little more clarification though.  In the Webster's dictionary, which I used before posting, it said hour was a noun and hourly was an adjective.

Thoughts?
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hillsbororiver

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Question about age-noun and adjective
« Reply #4 on: May 11, 2006, 08:53:04 PM »

hourly[1] (adverb)
hourly[2] (adjective)

Function: adverb
Pronunciation: 'au(-&)r-le
: at or during every hour ; also : FREQUENTLY , CONTINUALLY

Function: adjective
1 a : occurring hour by hour <hourly bus service> b : FREQUENT , CONTINUAL <in hourly expectation of the rain's stopping>
2 : computed in terms of an hour <an hourly wage>
3 : paid by the hour <hourly workers>

That is hourly, then we have hour;

hour (noun)
hour angle (noun)
hour circle (noun)
hour hand (noun)
hour-long (adjective)
ampere-hour (noun)
canonical hour (noun)
coffee hour (noun)
credit hour (noun)
eleventh hour (noun)
half hour (noun)
happy hour (noun)
kilowatt-hour (noun)
man-hour (noun)
off-hour (noun)
person-hour (noun)
quarter hour (noun)
rush hour (noun)
semester hour (noun)
sidereal hour (noun)
watt-hour (noun)
zero hour (noun)
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hillsbororiver

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Question about age-noun and adjective
« Reply #5 on: May 11, 2006, 08:58:40 PM »

eon
aeon (noun)

eon
variant of AEON

ae·on
Variants: or eon
Etymology: Latin, from Greek aiOn -- more at AYE
1 : an immeasurably or indefinitely long period of time : AGE
2 a usually eon : a very large division of geologic time usually longer than an era b : a unit of geologic time equal to one billion years
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Mickyd

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Question about age-noun and adjective
« Reply #6 on: May 11, 2006, 10:21:11 PM »

Eonian

adj 1: of or relating to a geological eon (longer than an era) [syn: aeonian] 2: lasting for an indefinitely long period of time [syn: everlasting, eternal, lasting, aeonian]

2: Of, relating to, or constituting an eon.
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